Argument Against Buying Meat from Factory Farms

This is an argument against buying meat from factory farms presented in premise-conclusion form.
  1. If X can experience pleasure/pain, then it can possess well-being.
    1. If X can experience pleasure/pain, then it can have subjective experiences. 
    2. If X can have subjective experiences, then it has a life that can go better or worse.
    3. If X can have a life that can go better or worse, then it can possess well-being.
    4. Therefore, if X can experience pleasure/pain, then it can possess well-being. (This follows 1-3.)
  2. Most of the animals we eat can experience pleasure/pain.
  3. Therefore, most of the animals we eat can possess well-being. (This follows 1 & 2.)
  4. If X can possess well-being, then it has moral status.
    1. If X can possess well-being, then it can be harmed.
    2. If X can be harmed, then it has moral status.
      1. If X can be harmed, then it can be wronged.
      2. If X can be wronged, then it has moral status.
      3. Therefore, if X can be harmed, then it has moral status. (This follows 1-2.)
    3. Therefore, if X can possess well-being, then it has moral status. (This follows 1-2.)
  5. Therefore, most of the animals we eat have moral status. (This follows 3 & 4.)
  6. We ought not to support industries (by buying any of their products) that mistreat beings that have moral status, unless there is an overriding moral reason to do so.
  7. Factory farms are industries that mistreat beings that have moral status.
  8. There is no overriding moral reason to buy any products produced by factory farms.
  9. Therefore, we ought not to buy any products produced by factory farms. (This follows 6-9.)
  10. One of the products of factory farms is meat.
  11. Therefore, we ought not to buy meat from factory farms. (This follows 9-10.)
Notice that the argument is consistent with the position that eating meat is morally permissible. Given the reality of how people get their meat, however, not buying meat from factory farms would very likely lead to low meat consumption.

Also notice that the green argument likely implies that plants have moral status. Plants can possess well-being. However, this doesn't mean that all moral status is equal; such a position would require another argument. So it'd be consistent with the above argument to say that plants have moral status but very little of it.